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Outside the Lines
12/09/2019 19:14
Is this appropriate for a country that supposedly believes in freedom of speech?

https://www.lewrockwell.com/2019/09...BerxXLb9rUGy6_oRX20yamKzYOI1yDf-WdujtrhU

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There have been several interesting developments in the United States government’s war on free speech and privacy. First of all, the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) Customs and Border Protection Agency (CBP), which is responsible for actual entry of travelers into the country, has now declared that it can legally access phones and computers at ports of entry to determine if there is any subversive content which might impact on national security. “Subversive content” is, of course, subjective, but those seeking entry can be turned back based on how a border control agent perceives what he is perusing on electronic media.

Unfortunately, the intrusive nature of the procedure is completely legal, particularly as it applies to foreign visitors, and is not likely to be overturned in court in spite of the Fourth Amendment’s constitutional guarantee that individuals should “…be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures.” Someone at a port of entry is not legally inside the United States until he or she has been officially admitted. And if that someone is a foreigner, he or she has no right by virtue of citizenship even to enter the country until entry has been permitted by an authorized US Customs and Border Protection official. And that official can demand to see anything that might contribute to the decision whether or not to let the person enter.

And there’s more to it than just that. Following the Israeli model for blocking entry of anyone who can even be broadly construed as supporting a boycott, the United States now also believes it should deny admittance to anyone who is critical of US government policy, which is a reversal of previous policy that considered political opinions to be off-limits for visa denial. DHS, acting in response to pressure from the White House, now believes it can adequately determine hostile intent from the totality of what appears on one’s phone or laptop, even if the material in question was clearly not put on the device by the owner. In other words, if a traveler has an email sent to him or her by someone else that complains about behavior by the United States government, he or she is responsible for that content.

One interesting aspect of the new policy is that it undercuts the traditional authority of US Embassies and Consulates overseas to issue visas to foreigners. The State Department visa process is rigorous and can include employment and real property verification, criminal record checks, social media reviews and Google-type searches. If there is any doubt about the visa applicant, entry into the US is denied. With the new DHS measures in place, this thoroughly vetted system is now sometimes being overruled by a subjective judgment made by someone who is not necessarily familiar with the traveler’s country or even regarding the threat level that being a citizen of that country actually represents.
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Outside the Lines
12/09/2019 19:09
Words to avoid using if you don't want teh government spying on you.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...-asCUfflIcqpeyybtohgPnWiUg#ixzz1w1SkH6gY

[Linked Image]
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Outside the Lines
06/09/2019 14:38
https://www.breitbart.com/politics/...breitbart-story-on-controversial-tweets/

A U. of Alabama dean resigned after apparent backlash over his assertion that the flag is a symbol of racism. That's one at least.
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Baltimore Orioles
31/08/2019 20:32
Wednesday's game has been canceled and they will play 2 on Tuesday.
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Outside the Lines
29/08/2019 05:03
Queen Elizabeth officially agreed to Prime Minister Boris Johnson's request to suspend Parliament. This will help make sure that the lefties in Parliament can't undermine Brexit.

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-49493632

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Parliament will be suspended just days after MPs return to work in September - and only a few weeks before the Brexit deadline.

Boris Johnson said a Queen's Speech would take place after the suspension, on 14 October, to outline his "very exciting agenda".

But it means the time MPs have to pass laws to stop a no-deal Brexit on 31 October would be cut.

[Opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn] said when MPs return to the Commons next Tuesday, "the first thing we'll do is attempt legislation to prevent what [the PM] is doing", followed by a vote of no confidence "at some point".

Three Conservative members of the Queen's Privy Council took the request to suspend Parliament to the monarch's Scottish residence in Balmoral on Wednesday morning on behalf of the prime minister.

It has now been approved, allowing the government to suspend Parliament no earlier than Monday 9 September and no later than Thursday 12 September, until Monday 14 October.
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Baltimore Orioles
23/08/2019 16:52
Check out his walks and hit batters. It's crazy.

pitching blindfolded
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